I’d like to remind my followers to send in their stories to

The challenge is to write a story that would fit with the photo below. Maximum length is 300 words. Three winners will be chosen. Their stories will be posted on this blog and they may choose the e-book version of one of my four novels for free. Send your stories to

Be brave. You don’t have to be an expert writer to enter. You can write anything that has a connection to the photo.


Who might have lived here?

What hardships might they have endured?

What drove them away?

These are just a few thoughts to get your wheels turning. Perhaps someone living here had a unique experience. Perhaps there are animals involved in the story. 300 words is barely more than a page, so why not give it a try. You don’t have to be a world-famous author to send in a story. You might win a free e-book and the contest costs you nothing.

Please send your stories to me before November 30, 2016.

Writing Contest

The challenge is to write a story that would fit with the photo below. Maximum length is 300 words. Three winners will be chosen. Their stories will be posted on this blog and they may choose the e-book version of one of my four novels for free. Send your stories to

Be brave. You don’t have to be an expert writer to enter. You can write anything that has a connection to the photo.

I reserve the right to copy-edit the winning posts for correct spelling and word usage without changing the sentence structure or meaning. The authors would be informed of the changes before publication and may opt out if they disagree.

Contest ends November 30, 2016.



Smorgasbord Summer Reading – The Right Wrong Man by Pamela S. Wight

Reblogged from Sally Cronin’s blog:

Smorgasbord - Variety is the spice of life

smorgasbord Summer Reading

Today’s summer reading is The Right Wrong Man by Pamela S. Wight, and is a crime thriller that takes you from Boston to the Caibbean along with Meredith Powers who has been thrust into an international intrigue.


About the book

Meredith Powers’ career as a medical editor seems safe enough as she searches for love with the right man. But she is pulled suddenly from her serene world in Boston to one of intrigue, kidnapping, and murder in the Caribbean.

Meredith’s simple life becomes terribly complicated when she works with an author who drags her into a drug heist. The reappearance of her ex-boyfriend, the D.E.A. agent, and the stunning response from her current accountant boyfriend all lead to complications, danger, and more than a few questions.

Meredith wonders if she really knows the people who surround her in her daily life. Her parents, her best friends, her boss, even…

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Grammar Manners Matter

Exemplary Behavior – by Horatio Henry Couldery (1832-1893)


Having and using good manners will always be important to me. Although I don’t feed my dogs at the table, I couldn’t help admiring the good manners displayed by the dogs in this painting.

My old “Good Manners for All Occasions” says it’s polite for the man to open the door for the lady, and for that matter, for any younger person to open it for the older one. This custom is considered to be polite, but in the penguin world, letting someone else go first is based on survival.


Penguins stand in a line at the edge of the ice, ready to go for a dip in the ocean for a bit of fishing. Who will test the waters first? The crowd gathers at the water’s edge jostling each other until finally, one of them falls in. If he isn’t attacked by a lurking leopard seal in the next few moments, the rest of the penguins dive in.

But surely, we humans have evolved from these primitive, yet effective, tactics. We now consider it polite to allow others to go first. We offer others the first choice from the food platter, even though it occasionally backfires on us.

This was the case when at dinner, Joe passed the meat platter to his brother Bob first before helping himself. When Joe complained because Bob took the biggest piece, Bob asked, “What would you have done?”

Joe sniffed. “I would have taken the smaller piece, of course.”

“Well, you have it,” Bob said. “So what’s the problem?”


In spite of these odd cases, modern society generally agrees that we should let others go first. And so it is with grammar.

We name the other person(s) first and then ourselves. If it is that simple, why is it still such a problem in our writing?

Following are some tips and guidelines.

When naming others first, we would not begin a sentence with: Me and Joe, Me and him, Me and her, I and Joe.

Okay, we know we should name Joe first, but even so, is it Him and me, Joe and me, or Joe and I?

Let’s look at some sample sentences where you and Joe are the subjects of the verb. Here are the possibilities:

Joe and me / Joe and I / Him and me / Him and I / He and me / He and I / drove to town.


When in doubt, leave Joe out. Without Joe in the car, you are in the driver’s seat and of course you would say “I drove to town” not “Me drove to town.” When you take on that extra passenger, if you need to get the feel of whether it’s Joe or him or he, try leaving yourself out. “Joe drove to town” or “Him drove to town” or “He drove to town”?

“Him drove to town” simply does not work, so you can use either “Joe” or He.”


I’m still shocked when I see sentences like “Me and him went to the party.” You would never say “Me went to the party” or “Him went to the party,” so why would you say “Me and him” or even “Him and me” (went to the party)? Same goes for “She” and “Her.”

And now we come to the other situation where you and Joe are the objects of the verb. Which is correct? The sun shone on:

me and Joe

Joe and me

Joe and I

him and me

him and I

he and I

First rule is to mention others first so that narrows it down to Joe/him/he and me/I. Second, leave out me/I and we have “The sun shone on Joe (or him).” Then leave out Joe and we have “The sun shone on me” (you wouldn’t say “I”). So together we have “The sun shone on Joe/him and me.” Better yet, say “The sun shone on us.”

Now may the sun shine on your grammar and mine.

Anneli new footer c


Big E-book Sale!

All through July you can get my four novels at bargain prices through

This reliable company can provide you with e-books whether you have a Kindle, Nook, Sony, or Kobo, and most likely any other that I haven’t thought of.

For each book, click on the link under the cover image and you can download your half-price book. The Wind Weeps is still FREE, and the other three are $1.50 each. What a bargain that is! Just enter the coupon code SSW50 for each one at the checkout.

eBOOK [1]



Front Cover Only

Over the Moon about June and her New Book

My guest is June Moonbridge.

J.Moonbridge aka P.RovereAbout the author:
June was born in June and she always loved the moon. She comes from Slovenia, a country which got its independence almost three decades ago.

She studied economics, and quickly realized she hated it. Afterwards, she found herself working in  mainly male-dominated businesses; at first in automotive and later steel products. She can choose the best steel for your project, but don’t, please don’t, ask her which lipstick brand you should use.

She started to write in high school and was criticized by her teacher. Stubborn as she is, that didn’t stop her. Under different pen names, she had stories published in magazines, and then went on to publish three books.

After having two children, and learning that her second child has autism, she married their father and carried on working. Work and family life left her with little free time. But the desire to write didn’t die. When life somehow sorted itself out, she decided to write a novel in English and her first submissions were rejected.

For what happened then, re-read the third paragraph, second sentence above.


If you’re like most readers, you like to know what you’re getting into, so have a look at the “blurb” on the back cover of June’s new book.

Pageflex Persona [document: PRS0000035_00033]

Here is an excerpt:

…It took most of my strength to get out of bed. Although I spotted my shoes by the bed, I stayed barefooted. While still feeling dizzy, the previous evening came back slowly to me. I started to count how many glasses of champagne I’d had, but it was just too much for me to remember.

Looking around the room again, I tried to think where I was. How had I got here? Who’d undressed me? My eyes stopped on the bed I’d slept in. It was messy, but not only on the side where I slept, but on the other too.

A name finally surfaced from my heavy head. Lorcan. I’d left the Crest Charity Ball with him. The next question that came to my mind was: Where the hell is Harry? Why didn’t he come to get me? He knew who accompanied me when I left.

Seeing myself in the mirror made me grimace. I tried to get my hair sorted at least, and I started to comb it with my hands but it was far too knotty. So I picked up a ribbon that I’d had in my hair the previous night and made myself a firm knot at the base of my neck. I felt a little better, but the taste in my mouth was awful and I was still unaware of where I was or what time it was.

I could hear someone talking on the other side of the door: Harry and Lorcan. How much conversation I’d missed I didn’t know.

“I don’t understand,” I heard Harry say. Lorcan answered him with a question.


“I don’t understand how she fell asleep in the car. She drank two, maybe three glasses of champagne … Alright, there was that glass of brandy in the car…”

“What? How much?”

“She drank a glass of brandy in the car and those two glasses at the table…” Harry’s voice was a little broken. And then silence again. I wondered myself how much I’d drunk and was unable to recollect, but was pretty sure I drank a lot more than Harry said. The painful throbbing in my head was proof of that.

“From the moment I arrived, she drank at least six glasses of champagne. How much she had drunk before—I’m not sure. The last one…”

“What did you say?”

I could just imagine the astonished expression on Harry’s face. I sighed. The men didn’t know I was awake or that I was listening to their conversation.

“You heard me. It looks like she’s not accustomed to heavy drinking. So what made her drink?” Lorcan’s voice was calm.

Silence again. I started to wonder if Harry would tell him what was going on in our life to make me behave the way I did. So much was going on, not least Lorcan Shore!

“I’m not the one to tell you. She’ll have to tell you herself. If she wants to.” I had a hard job hearing Harry’s quietly spoken voice. “What I think is … and don’t misunderstand me … but getting involved with you doesn’t help her at all. We’ll solve her problems alone.”

I realised we were on a slippery slope. I had to stop myself from entering the sitting room.

“What problems?” The tone of Lorcan’s voice changed. I didn’t like it. No one liked to hear that someone had problems…


You can buy June’s books here: