Dance When the Brain Says No

This is Leslie Doyle, math whiz, poet, creative seamstress, beautiful young woman, and daughter of my friend, Kathleen Price.

Leslie 1984

Leslie [1] 1984

Leslie 1983

My guest today is Kathleen Price.She taught human development and family studies courses in Prescott, Arizona, while also maintaining a private practice in marriage and family therapy. She authored the course manuals that were used in a community parent education program. Kathleen lives in Salt Lake City now, retired from teaching, but still writing and publishing.

I’ve asked her to tell us about her book and how it came to be published.

Welcome, Kathleen.

Kate

During my daughter’s illness, I kept a journal as a way to sort out and put words to my feelings. After Leslie died I knew that someday I would write a book about her, so I began putting down other memories I hadn’t yet recorded about her childhood and adolescence, and that became a way of resolving my grief.  Once I retired twenty years later, with greater objectivity about that experience, I returned to all those writings and began to put them in some logical and coherent order. That became the memoir that I published in 2009—Dance When the Brain Says No. 

Front Cover

This is a story you just have to read.

Find it at: amazon.com

Writing a Book

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How did I ever get started writing a book? What made me think I could do it? Now that I’ve done it several times, how do I feel about it?

I honestly don’t know why I wrote a book. I love writing, but mostly my writing involved short stories that evolved from sending emails to friends telling them about  funny things that happened to me on outings like trout fishing or mushroom picking.

I suppose the stories got longer and longer until one day I had to tell the story of a woman who lived in a remote cabin with a man who turned out to be mentally unstable. He was like the little girl with the curl, right in the middle of her forehead — remember that poem?) Like her, “when he was good, he was very, very good, but when he was bad, he was horrid.”

This woman and her captor had a story to tell, so I thought, Why not? I could tell this story.

That was when my education began, about how to write a novel. It was so much more complicated than just dashing off a magazine article or a blog post. So much  to learn.

I was lucky. I joined the local writers group, found a good friend and author, Darlene Jones, who became my best ever writing buddy and critiquer, and another good writer friend, Kathleen Price, who is a great substantive editor and understands how to prepare a novel for the paperback layout.

With the help of these two good writer-friends, and a supportive husband who has all the commercial fishing background to fill in the gaps in the setting of my coastal story and check it for accuracy, I was able to write The Wind Weeps.

When I got to the end of the book, I had a dilemma. I couldn’t decide which of the eight possible endings to use. Each one left some readers unhappy. No way could I please everyone.

There was only one solution. Write the ending that I liked, and then write a sequel. In a few weeks that  sequel should be available to readers. I’m so glad because it has been a long, hard journey to get it there. Between The Wind Weeps and its sequel, I wrote two other novels (Orion’s Gift and Julia’s Violinist). But get ready, Reckoning Tide is coming your way soon.

You can find my books on amazon.com and on smashwords.com

Please leave a comment and tell us how you got started in writing.