Writing Styles – Part 1

The Restaurant 3dWriters all have different ways of conveying meaning to their readers. In this post I’ve asked authors to provide short excerpts with examples of how they’ve developed description of a character and a setting. A third challenge was to provide a sentence or two showing their favourite ending to a scene.

My first guest is Linn B. Halton with excerpts from her novel, “The Restaurant @ the Mill.”

linnbhalton

1. CHARACTER: He stood in front of me looking curiously awkward. He pulled a business card out of his pocket and handed it to me, going very red in the face. “Er… great night,” he said. “Could you give me a ring sometime maybe?” I took the card from his hand and looked up at him, rather surprised. – Ben Adams

2. SETTING: It captivated me from that first moment, as Ben and I stood outside admiring the front of the old mill. The stream that originally fed the water wheel was only a trickle now and disappeared under the tarmac below our feet. It flowed on beneath the floor on the north side of the building. The wheel itself was located outside, behind the kitchen, although it no longer worked. The stream reappeared in the far corner and ran on down through the garden as far as the eye could see. It lent a gentle bubbling sound to the air, which would once have been a loud rushing torrent when the watercourse was unobstructed.

3. SCENE ENDING : “Hi five?” he asked, hand held aloft and as I raised mine in triumph, the deal was struck – The Restaurant @ The Mill was born; it might not have been perfect, but as I’ve learned from past experience, perfect isn’t always the best option.

Link   http://linnbhalton.co.uk/the-restaurant-the-mill/

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I‘ve decided to join in the fun myself:

Anneli Purchase

Anneli Purchase

I’ve taken my character and setting descriptions and chapter ending from my novel “The Wind Weeps.”

1. CHARACTER: One of the older boat owners and a permanent resident of Lund, Edgar was probably in his seventies, but he hopped out onto the float with the spryness of a much younger man. He was shadowed by an invisible pong of oil and garbage. I wrinkled my nose and reached for the stern line to help him tie up.

2. SETTING: I pushed open the door and took a deep breath of the fresh sea air. The tang of iodine told me it was low tide. It wasn’t a bad smell, but it definitely belonged to the seashore. I pulled my toque over my ears against the chill and started up the trail behind the house. Immediately the iodine smell gave way to the aroma of moss and decay and the scent of firs freshly washed with rain. The forest floor was soft with layers of organic material; fir needles, ferns, moss, and decayed fallen trees made the ground firm enough, yet spongy. I wondered for how many thousands, maybe hundreds of thousands, of years that had been going on.I filled my lungs with the wholesome earthy aroma. If I stayed here long enough, maybe I would die here and become part of this cycle. There were worse places to end up.

3. SCENE ENDING: No job, only $800 in my purse, no family, no friends–and now this gorgeous hunk of a man turns out to be a woman.

The Wind Weeps

Link to “The Wind Weeps” and other books by Anneli Purchase: www.anneli-purchase.com

Check back in a few days for more guests in the next of the series on “Writing Styles.”

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The Restaurant @ The Mill

Today’s guest is the lovely Linn Halton from the UK. Welcome Linn.

Linns bookshelf

About the author: Linn writes contemporary women’s love stories that reflect life, the baggage we all carry around with us and the complexities of relationships. You are always guaranteed an uplifting ending that won’t disappoint and often a psychic twist that will make you stop and think… what if? Linn lives in the small village of Arlingham, in the UK.

Linn signed with US publishing house Sapphire Star Publishing in 2012; The Quintessential Gemini, a heart-warming romance was released in June 2012 and The Restaurant @ The Mill, a collection of life/love stories based around an old mill, was released in August 2012. Linn is a member of the Romantic Novelists’ Association.

linnbhalton

Linn’s links:

Website

Twitter: @LinnBHalton

Facebook: Linn B Halton

Amazon.co.uk (buy)

Amazon.com (buy)

Pinterest

A Loveahappyending Lifestyle feature editor

Signed by: http://www.sapphirestarpublishing.com/linnbhalton

Romantic Novelists’ Association page

 

It’s lovely to be here with you today Anneli. Wish it was in person as I would love to visit your very beautiful part of the world!

The mill featured on the cover

Setting is so very important when writing a novel and when I wrote The Restaurant @ The Mill it was crucial. The mill around which this novel is based is actually a composite of two existing buildings. Both are beautiful, old mills that have been preserved and retain a sense of atmosphere. One is a working water mill, which was one of the features in the book and allowed me to provide some accurate description. The other was a pin mill, and had a layout that would work if I were converting an old building into a restaurant. The composite building became very real to me. I could walk around it in my head and see it as if it were a place I had visited!

It was important though, as I wanted the readers to fall in love with what was essentially the heart of this book. I needed them to regard it as having an existence of its own; the characters were simply a transient part of the life of the old building. It is the restaurant that is the common theme, bringing together the stories of love at every stage in life – from newlyweds to a couple in their twilight years. Whilst the spirit of “Sarah” is a cameo role within the novel, she helps to gently remind the reader of the age of the building. She sees everything that is happening through the eyes of a Victorian mill owner’s wife, albeit a slightly confused and disorientated one at times. Her purpose was to bring a sense of generation and history, and a reminder that what was happening in the here and now was simply another passing phase in the life of the mill.

Some of the individual stories of the couples who dine there play out to a conclusion, some are a work in progress – in the same way that life itself is never “complete” because no one knows what tomorrow will bring.

My favourite restaurant is in a very old building in Nailsworth, Gloucestershire in the UK. When I sit there I can almost feel the presence of the past – I do hope that is what the readers take away from my story.

The Restaurant 3d

The Restaurant is not just about the owners, Hilary and Ben, but as “The Restaurant @ The Mill” thrives and comes alive with the conversations and emotions of people unconnected in their day-to-day lives, another five stories unfold. Only one thing is certain, life is an eternal struggle and that is the common thread, which ties us all together. Life, love, sadness and happiness….

The Restaurant @ The Mill; the owners, the staff and the customers – each of the six individual stories reflect a different set of life and love problems. One thing ties them together, they all frequent the Mill.

Is happiness guaranteed? Not necessarily, but when love fails it simply means it’s time to move on. Can young love survive when two people have been parted for most of their lives? Can a lonely man ever find the peace and true love he seeks? Will old wounds ever heal and can people learn to love again?

And then there is the spirit of a young woman named Sarah, who wanders the Mill looking for her beloved husband. Will she ever be able to rest? The Restaurant sees it all.