Jargon

Why use ten words when two will do? We don’t want to tire the reader.

The long way:

He spends his spare time skinning animals and making replicas of them by stretching their hides over a frame.

The more sensible way:

His hobby is taxidermy.

Instead of:

He got out the game board with the black and white squares.

Just say:

He got out the checkerboard.

Instead of:

Could you please hand me one of those small rods for stirring the drinks?

Just say:

Could you pass me a swizzle stick?

If you know what you are trying to say, why give the long-winded definition of it? Just use the word.

Wordy:

In terms of organization it was a shambles, but in terms of program content it was good.

Less wordy:

The organization was a shambles but the program content was good.

In many cases, there is no need for “in terms of.”

Wordy:

He is the person who is in charge of the meeting.

Less wordy:

He is in charge of the meeting.

No need for “the person who.”

Sometimes a word can replace a whole phrase:

She had a reservation for the ferry that goes from Comox to Powell River.

She had a reservation for the Comox – Powell River ferry.

*** Keep in mind that more is not always better, especially with words.

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