Writing Styles – Part 11 – Embroiled

Embroiled is the last of a series of four novels about an amazing woman. You’ve met her as Em, or Miracle Madame in Embattled. She was Jasmine in Empowered, and Abby in Embraced. Em’s latest reincarnation will have you turning pages to find out why she is so obsessed with getting out of this world. No, she doesn’t want to die, but something or someone is drawing her like a magnet and she is finding the pull hard to resist.

IMG_1077Author Darlene Jones will share with us some snippets of her setting, character, and a scene ending from this amazing novel.

EMBROILED

 CHARACTER: Hypnosis! Emily slammed a pot on the counter. She hated cooking, but she had to eat. She didn’t need hypnosis. She remembered it all. Every single damn obsession.

SETTING: “I’m driving home from the conference when the slough catches my eye. I’m mesmerized by the damn thing. I feel an insane urge to walk on the thin fall ice, to explore the fishing holes, to lie spread-eagled to distribute my weight. I know full well I’ll break through and drown, but I’ll be warm and taken care of. What I find down there will make it worthwhile.” Emily felt her chest tighten. Each time she came to David’s office, each time she spoke of her greatest fears, she felt the strings to sanity loosening. Am I crazy, Doc?

SCENE ENDING SENTENCE: What is holding you back from loving and being loved?”

Emily sucked in air. “Whatever is under that ice,” she whispered. “That’s what.”

 ?????????????????????????????????????????????For more information about this fascinating series, please visit Darlene Jones’ webpage:

http://www.emandyves.com

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Writing Styles – Part 10 – Just Add Spice

My guest today is Carol E. Wyer, an author from the UK. You’ll love the humour in her novels. Carol will enlighten us about her writing style giving us a sample of a setting, a scene ending, and a character description.

AuthorCarolWyer

I love teasing the reader. With a book called Just Add Spice I had to make it sound suggestive in parts but even the title is a play on words, and has more than one meaning. Writing light-hearted novels allows me many opportunities to make the reader guffaw and this book was no exception. My opening scene sets the tone for the book. How many readers managed to get the wrong idea about this?

The windows in the old Golf GTI were almost completely steamed up, thanks to the activities of the middle-aged woman and the young man inside it. The sudden rapid barking of a dog in the distance made the woman jump. She was already sweating and aware of a rancid aroma pervading the car. It was most certainly was coming from her partner–in-crime. He turned his head towards her and scowled.

“Hurry up, will you? I could have finished this twenty minutes ago.”

Dawn shrank at the reprimand. He might have been twenty-five years her junior, but he oozed menace. His dark eyes burrowed into hers.

The ending to this scene will surprise you. I intended the whole novel to surprise and delight readers and I think I succeeded. There are twists, turns and a whopper of a finale.

Just Add Spice is about a bored housewife who decides to write a novel. She joins a class of eccentric writers in town where she also meets the delicious Jason who shows more than a passing interest in her. It was tricky to write the book because it is about what happens when a writer gives too much life to a character. I had to write two credible characters and gradually weave them together in such a way that I still surprised the reader.

 Dawn Ellis craves excitement and adventure. Her character, Cinnamon Knight is a wild, wanton kick ass heroine who spends most of time wreaking revenge on cheating men. Dawn gradually gets taken over by Cinnamon and the line between reality and fiction blurs in a dramatic way.

The subject allowed me to write from two points of view and gave me plenty of scope to shock and amuse my readers. Cinnamon’s antics provide a lot of the spicy moments. Be warned, you may never be able to look at a lollipop n the same way again. I loved Cinnamon. She is outrageous. When she isn’t causing mayhem she keeps popping up and ‘talking’ to Dawn. She gives Dawn a lot of advice especially on the subject of her failing relationship with her husband:

“It’s his age,” commented Cinnamon from the bed. She was sitting on the edge of it, filing her long, painted nails. They were a deep maroon colour and matched her lipstick. Dawn looked at her own broken nails and made a mental note to file and paint them later that day. “His libido has dropped. His hormone levels have dropped, like yours have, and he’s discovering he can’t perform certain activities like he could. It’s not just his age. It’s probably all related to being thrown out of his job. He’s been emasculated. That has affected his physical prowess and, consequently, his ability to perform in the bedroom. Let’s be truthful here, he’s never been that great, has he? Not that you’d know what ‘great’ is. He is ignoring you, rather than try to start something he is worried he might not be able to finish. Check it out on the internet. He’s got physical difficulties due to stress and anxiety.”

Dawn reflected on that for a while. It made sense. Jim had changed dramatically since he gave up working. He was much more short-tempered than he ever used to be, and he seemed to be dispirited. She dressed and fired up the computer. There was plenty of information on various health websites. Three hours later, she was convinced her husband was definitely depressed and that the depression was due to being unemployed. She needed to help him. First things first, she needed to make him feel masculine. Cinnamon hovered about all the time she was online. She kept whispering in Dawn’s ear. In the end, Dawn gave in. She typed the word Viagra into Google and read some of the pages that came up.

It took no more than a click of a button for the deed to be done. Cinnamon yawned and stretched. “That should sort you both out. Now, what shall I get up to? I feel like having my own night of torrid sex with a good-looking man. Could you write me a nice scene, please?”

“Cinnamon, if I could muster up the imagination, I would, but at the moment I’m stumped. You’ll have to have a night off. I can’t do sex scenes. I am in an angry mood anyway, so I can’t even fire up any faded memories.”

Cinnamon gets some comic lines too:

It was Cinnamon’s fault she now held little blue pills in her hand and was planning on turning Jim into a sex machine.

On cue, Cinnamon appeared as Dawn hovered over the toilet, considering flushing the pills down it.

“Ah! Those’ll put some lead in his pencil,” she drawled.

“I’m not so convinced. I did some more research online. Some of these things aren’t safe. What if they are Chinese fake pills and are made up of blue paint and lead? Or, what if they make his heart beat too fast and he dies of over-exercise?”

“Or, over-sexercise,” suggested Cinnamon and snorted.

Most of the comedy comes from the eccentric writers that meet up each week and a post woman called Viv who catches Dawn in all manner of embarrassing situations.

Viv stood on the doorstep grinning wildly. Her electronic signature pad stuck out of her coat pocket, and her hands were behind her back.

“Morning!” she trumpeted when Dawn opened the door. “Got something for you, all the way from Canada.” A rather small packet covered in sticky labels appeared. Viv gave it a little shake as she handed it over, beaming at Dawn again.

“Now, let me see, what might it be? A tiny can of maple syrup, perhaps, or maybe a small model of a beaver, or some super-duper[C1]  pills you can’t get in Boots?” she joked. “What would you order online from Canada?” She asked, waggling her eyebrows in a comic fashion.

The characters in the writing group also provide a release from the plot:

“No, but boy, oh boy, does it sell books,” voiced Margaret, getting into the conversation now that it was no longer a spat between the two most vociferous members of the group. This latest Zee Zee Bagor novel is all over the newspapers. I was in Sainsbury’s yesterday, and copies of Hot and Lusty were flying off the shelves. Women were fighting each other to get a copy.”

“Did you get yours?” asked Craig, the cheeky car salesman from Essex.

Margaret blushed.

“Ah, you did then. Lend it me when you finish it, will you?” he laughed and blew her a kiss.

“Part of the success of Hot and Lusty is the mystery surrounding the author. No one has managed to track her down or interview her yet. Mystery sells as much as sex it seems,” commented Blake as he stacked up a pile of papers he had marked for the group.

“I bet she’s over eighty years old and has a face like a slapped arse,” said Craig.

The book is full of comic moments. I try to juxtapose humour alongside pathos. The two sit nicely together. Humour enhances tragedy, so I use it sparingly for that purpose. I always have some comic characters that offset the serious ones and I endeavour to put humour into most of the chapters, whether that be a throwaway line from one of the characters or a funny situation.

Reading one of my books is a roller-coaster journey, you’ll have moments when you reach for the tissues and then suddenly you’ll be laughing at something. Laughter and feeling good is imperative to my writing. The book has to finish on a high or a surprise or something that makes the reader want to read the next one. I can’t divulge the ending to this one but it’ll make you say, “Ooooh!”

9781908208224

LINKS:

Amazon UK Author Page :    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Carol-E.-Wyer/e/B005U34XNM/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Amazon US Author Page :     http://www.amazon.com/Carol-E.-Wyer/e/B005U34XNM/ref=ntt_dp_epwbk_0

Website: http://www.carolewyer.co.uk

Safkhet Publishing:  http://www.safkhetpublishing.com/authors/Carol_Wyer.htm

Smashwords: https://www.smashwords.com/profile/view/cewyer

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pages/Carol-E-Wyer/221149241263847

Twitter: https://twitter.com/carolewyer

Goodreads: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/5061207.Carol_E_Wyer


Emotion in Writing

When I read a book, I often base my opinion of whether it’s a good story or not, by the emotion it brought out in me. If a book made me laugh or cry it was usually a good one. Of course there are many other emotions besides happiness or sadness. Fear, paranoia, depression, sympathy, worry; they are all part of our emotions. It is the writer’s job to draw the reader into the story by making him care about the characters. As a reader, if I feel that I am emotionally drawn in, that usually means I’m enjoying the book.

I would like to share with you an excerpt from my novel, Julia’s Violinist. I hope you’ll feel some kind of emotion as you read it.

Excerpt from Julia’s Violinist

Three days later the POWs gathered their few possessions and lined up at the Stalag gates to have their passbooks stamped on their way to freedom. The last distribution of mail was done as the soldiers passed through the gates. Only a handful of POWs had mail. Karl thought he must have heard wrong when his name was called. The Russian guard tossed a tatty bundle of letters to him and read the next name. Karl was stunned. Not a single letter for over a year and now, on the last day, a bundle of … thirty-one, he counted. All from Julia.

He was frantic with wanting to open them, but nothing, not even these special letters, could make him lag behind in the POW camp. Out! Out! Just get out first, and then I can look at them.

As soon as he was out of sight of the prison camp, he sank down on the ground beside the road. His hands trembled as he opened the first letter. Through tears he saw her lovely handwriting, so perfect and neat; words that spoke of loneliness and longing. Each letter contained a small anecdote of Julia’s home life and ended with the hope that they would see each other again. Around the edges of the pages his name was written over and over in a border design, “KarlKarlKarlKarl. I miss you, Karl.”

He wasn’t sure how long he sat there. Other recently released POWs walked by. No one stopped. They had seen it all and there was nothing unusual about a man sitting in the dirt crying his eyes out as he read his mail.

Front Cover  jpg (1)(2)Julia’s Violinist is available at all amazon sites in paperback or Kindle and at smashwords.com in paperback and all e-reader formats. You can find out more about my books on my webpage:  http://www.anneli-purchase.com

Writing Styles – Part 9

EMBRACED is the third book in a series of four by Darlene Jones.

Goils 201

Em, the heroine of the series, has been reincarnated as Abby, a high school teacher who hears clicking in her teeth. Can you imagine if your teeth made clicks that sounded like Morse Code? Wouldn’t you worry that people would think you were crazy if you told them about it? But what is causing this clicking?

In this part of Writing Styles, we’ll be treated to a sample of Darlene Jones’s writing taken from her book “Embraced.”

CHARACTER: “God, I’m stupid. Whatever made me think Rice Krispies would lead me to an answer?” She sighed. Yet another failed attempt to identify the sounds. She dumped out the cereal, rinsed the bowl, and left it on the counter for morning.

SETTING: The play of clouds and moonlight over the water and mountains beyond calmed her. She licked her lips and tasted salt. From the heavily laden sea air or from tears? A few notes of music echoing across the water caught her attention. A bagpipe of all things.

SCENE ENDING SENTENCE: I don’t know why I think they’re messages from outer space.

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Find out more about Darlene Jones and her novels on her website  www.emandyves.com

Her books are available on amazon.com and smashwords.com